Choosing a Retrospective Topic


Choosing a Retrospective Topic


I am a firm believer that the best retrospectives tend to be focused on a specific topic. Picking a theme and exploring what we currently think of it, and how we can improve in that area is almost always more productive for a team than having a general "how can we get better" conversation.

But how do you pick the topic? There are a few common ways for teams to do this ...

Ask The Team

Dedicate some time at the start of the retrospective to ask the team what they think the topic should be.

This could be as simple as giving each member of the team three sticky notes and asking them to write a topic on each, then gathering them all on the wall and looking to see if there is a clear majority winner such as "Dealing wiht bugs."

Perhaps there are some connections that make sense to tackle together.

Alternatively, we could ask each team member to write three feelings on sticky notes and do the same exercise of clustering them on the wall.

We might then end up having a retrospective on frustrattion. Why are we frustrated? How could we become less frustrated in our next sprint?

Ballot Box

Technically, this is still in the "ask the team" area, but there is a difference in that this is anonymous and in real time before the retrospective as opposed to at the start of the meeting.

With ballot box, a box is placed in the team area where team members can post cards with an idea for a retrospective topic as they occur during the sprint.

Then, at the start of the retrospective, we just empty the box and see what ideas we have, and make a decision.

ScrumMaster Choice

In my Scrum Mastery course, I explain that I believe ScrumMasters should always reserve the right to pick the topic that the team should explore in a retrospective.

An elephant in the room is what the English refer to as an obvious truth that is going unaddressed.

alternative elephant

 

Sometimes the team may be too nervous to address the topic that really needs addressing and in those cases, the ScrumMaster should be prepared to help the team by highlighting it. 

As with anything, if the elephant is avoided for long enough, the team will develop coping mechanisms.

The problem is, these coping mechanisms don’t deal with the issue and actually make the problem even less likely to be removed because it doesn’t seem quite as necessary any more.

Great ScrumMasters courageously expose, and encourage teams to explore, the elephants in the room as soon as they notice them.

They don’t judge, but neither will they let their team tolerate and get dragged down by these problems.

Instead, they offer to lead an exploration. For example, the elephant in the room could be that one of the team members is getting into the office later and later.

The team is accommodating him by shifting the daily scrum and, sometimes, writing up their conversations, but this is leading to inefficient teamwork and resentment is growing in the team. 

Before this spirals into outright anger and rebellion, the team should confront and solve the problem.

Mirror

A great ScrumMaster acts as a mirror for the team so she can reflect back what is happening in the team.

This is not a finger-pointing exercise but done with as much compassion as ruthlessness so that the team feels this is important enough to tackle but not defensive about admitting it needs tackling.

I recently blogged on compassionate ruthlessness here.

There is always room for good old ScrumMaster intuition. During the sprint, ScrumMasters are in a privileged position, able to see a lot of what is going on with a certain detachment.

They can -- and should -- be listening to what is being said and what is not being said, looking out for good examples of team dynamics and development as well as opportunities for further team growth.

Great ScrumMasters have no issue with starting the retrospective with a challenge based on their own observations, for example:

“This sprint, I have noticed a larger proportion of time than normal has been spent on fixing defects. I wonder if it would be a good idea to take some time out to explore why this might be and what we could do about it.”

Set The Team Up

Whichever method you choose, and you will definitely take the context of the situation into account, it's almost always a great idea to start the retrospective with a compelling goal that engages the team and helps set them up for success.

Most of the time, this goal will come from the team, but sometimes, it's OK for the ScrumMaster to step in and challenge the team with a compelling challenge to explore. 

 



 

Geoff Watts is one of the leading Scrum thinkers in the world, and one of the few to hold both the Certified Scrum Trainer and Certified EnterpriseĀ Coach designation. As well as the popular book Scrum Mastery, Geoff is a sought after leadership coach and has also authoredĀ The Coach's Casebook: Mastering The Twelve Traits That Trap Us.

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